Mobile Home Dealer License Per State

Below is a breakdown by State of how many mobile homes you can sell in a 12 month period without needing a dealer’s license.

Please double check to see if there are any errors.

Alabama:1
Alaska:A
Arizona:3
Arkansas:1
California:0
Colorado:0
Delaware:5
Florida:1
Georgia:0
Idaho :6
Illinois:4
Indiana:A
Iowa:0
Kansas:A
Kentucky:1
Louisiana:3
Maine:0
Maryland:A
Massachusetts:A
Michigan:0
Minnesota:5
Missouri:4
Mississippi:3
Montana:A
Nebraska:0
Nevada:0
New Hampshire:3
New York:4
North Carolina:3
North Dakota:A
Ohio:4
Oklahoma:0
Oregon:3
Pennsylvania:3
South Carolina:4
Tennessee :1
Texas:1
Utah:2
Vermont:A
Virginia:5
Washington:0
West Virginia:6
Wisconsin:1

A “0” after the State name indicates a state that asks you to obtain your mobile home retailer or dealer license before you buy and sell any mobile homes for profit. Homes that are considered your primary residence or secondary residences do not count.

An “A” after your State name indicates a state that does not have a cap on the number of mobile homes you may buy and sell for profit without a mobile homes retailer or dealer license.

source = https://www.mobilehomeinvesting.net/mobile-home-license-per-state-how-many-can-you-buysell-per-12-month-period/

Correction:

Illinois - You may not sell any new homes in Illinois without a dealer’s license, but you may sell up to 4 used homes.

How does this apply to used homes sold on a rent credit program? In other words, do I need one for selling used homes on a rent credit program?

Coach, you’ll need one once you start transferring title (even under rent credit). Until then, you should be good. Here is your link for Florida:

http://www.flhsmv.gov/dmv/dealer.html

I would just go ahead and get it to get it out of the way.

Thanks Charles, I’ve already checked into the course, it looks pretty easy.

With rent to own and lease to own, the day you transfer the title is what the state agencies will view as the date of the sale. However, other state law may count a “contract for deed / lease to own” transaction as done the date the contract was signed. State laws on transfers of property, and MH specifically, vary significantly.

Remember to treat every transaction of an MH you make as a significant deal that requires the proper transfer forms, waivers (arbitration form), notices (formaldehyde…), safety sign offs (ex. Home and steps are safe, smoke detector sign off), etc. Done right, these type of forms will save you a large loss and huge headache in the future. See the forms section of www.MobileAgency.com for a number of quality MH transaction forms and waivers. Most state laws treat MH transactions as “transactions of goods” and thus all the product liability laws that go along with that.