CRM Software Choices

Any comments/opinions on HubSpot vs Salesforce, or any other CRM software?
Thanks!!!

I’m partial to Dynamics 365, but that is because my 9-5 job is working with Dynamics. :wink:

That said, I think it will depend a lot on your size. Dynamics and Salesforce are gorillas, but they cost a ton of money (and assume you have a few users). I don’t know much about HubSpot, but my understanding is that it might be a little bit easier to scale with a tool intended for a smaller use base. I’ve also seen a lot of ads for Monday.com which looks like it has some CRM and Project Management built into it which would be good for MHP things I think.

When you say “CRM” what do you intend the software to do for you? That might help further narrow the field.

Mainly for tracking leads and prospects. I have 1000-2000 owners I’ve talked to over the past few years, and I’m trying to get them all set on on a follow up system. Currently I’m using my Google calendar and, as you can imagine, it has become a nightmare. I will have 2 or 3 users on it. User friendly interface, ease of onboarding the data, and interface with my email account are what is important

@Jlcgul I would recommend Hubspot. They have a free version of their CRM which you can use personally to create task, update leads/accts, etc. The paid version is needed for more detail lead generation/follow-up or a bigger team. Plus, you can tie-in the Hubspot marketing for aspects of your reach out. I use it in my business and it works great.

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I use the Hubspot free version. Depending on your size and need for scalability, you may need to upgrade to the pay version. But first, determine what you really need this for and then match that to the product.

As a former software consultant, I made a living selling and supporting software solutions. Now that I operate my parks full-time, I’m extremely mindful to the costs associated with software products.

I’ve seen businesses pay for “more functionality than they need” over and over again. They pay for software not realizing what they actually need it for and then only use 20% of the features while paying for 100% of the product.

A CRM tool is nothing more than an electronic Rolodex. Consider all the use cases for the product and then determine how robust you need the software to be.

As Dabeatty mentioned, the free Hubspot tool is pretty good. The best part is that it’s free. If you a nifty workflow, it might not work. If all you need is a way to log prospects and a log to track communications, it’ll work just fine.

Best!
Jon

I recommend use custom software for your purpose.

MhCRM focuses on manufactured housing. I would be curious to see if they have a good solution.

We use Zoho Creator and developed our own CRM (note that this is different from Zoho CRM). We tried some of the off-the-shelf products but found they were too complicated , even for the scaled back versions. It is very ironic that we had to develop our own to keep it simple. Fact is that a mobile home renter is not a long term sales process, so we don’t need software to track that lead for years on end. We basically take the name, phone, email, and no more than 10 other basic data points on first call, and have a predetermined follow-up process. The whole process lasts about a week typically, then the case is closed. If closed as if in a sale, the prospect is converted from the CRM to our Property Management software.

One thing that I do not like about existing CRM is that they are often geared around web and internet meaning that emails automatically are generated and/or stored in the system. Our prospects are often contacted by postal mail and telephone, which is an older marketing tactic and not the focus of many CRMs. I would like to hear of a CRM that helps to track postal mail for outbound direct mail. A feature to print a mailing list would be helpful in this.

CRM development company promises credibility and they have an in-house team that is dedicated to working on a project plus everything is systematic so you need not worry about anything. But when you hire a freelancer he may have the expertise or not, you never know and freelancers generally don’t have a team of professionals.