Tenant Claims Family with Criminal History is Not Staying the Nights


#1

Hello all,

What do you do when you have someone who claims their family member with a criminal history is not technically living there or sleeping there. In other words they claim they just visit a lot and live somewhere else. I have tried to get them to fill out an application and submit a background check but they refuse.


#2

If it’s your property and you don’t want someone on it for any given reason, then that’s the way it goes. Your gut feeling is usually right if not always on matters like this. If you or a manager is around to monitor when that person comes and goes. Regardless, you control who comes in and out if roads/property are private. Chances are if you see that person more than once a week, they’re probably staying there.


#3

I do not think it is that easy here in Minnesota unfortunately. For example I had a bad tenant that I got out of the park a year ago and she still had family in another home. She would come daily to visit with them and I had an officer serve her with a no trespassing. Turns out she can still be escorted from the entrance of the park to the family members home and back by the family member who she visits. She just can not come onto the property without being escorted by a resident.


#4

Remove the family she visit.


#5

I find that to be somewhat of a touchy situation from my viewpoint as a background screener, given the fact that “technically” they are not included in the lease and therefore not subject to certain disqualifiers.
Does your association have any written policies or by-laws that defines outside guests?
For instance, we provide our background screening services to multiple charities that allow family members to come in and out of the premises where a sick family member is being treated, even if they are not staying overnight, but are by definition in the premises a vast majority of the time.
In addition, have there been any complaints from any other tenants in your park? if so, that may be probable cause for the police to intervene and maybe enough to let that person know they are under their radar.