Water Lines...New...Specific Steps...Thanks!


#1

QUESTIONS:

  • “Has any Mobile Home Park Owner installed New Water Lines & Individual Water Meters?”
  • “IF yes, what steps did you take?”
  • “IF yes, are you satisfied?”

#2

PREVIOUS POST - FROM @ROLF - MAY 2016:

  • Here are steps to install New Water Lines that @Rolf posted in May 2016

@Rolf , thank you for your past post!

@Rolf Post - May 2016:

"As far as specifics, here are a few.

I was a landscape contractor for many years and irrigation was a big part of my work.

Irrigation actually requires way more design competence than a potable water system.

  1. Always loop the lines.
    This will keep even pressure throughout the park.
  2. Use isolation valves to block off sections of park for repairs.
    This keeps you from having to shut down the entire park to fix a leak. I am pretty anal about this and actually put in 2 isolation valves 4’ apart. One can fail but two failing is unlikely. I also use at least 2’ of brass pipe on either side of a valve because turning a valve puts LOTS of stress on pipes. Brass can take the stress.
  3. Bed the lines in sand with a tracer line as was stated above.
    Really good advice.
  4. Allow for all-weather risers in several places in the park.
    This will make your life much easier if they are ever needed.
  5. Use top quality parts, especially valves, as the cheap ones will cost you grief and money over time.
    I always specified valves made in America or Italy and would never buy anything from China or Thailand. I learned early on that one call back to fix a POS part from China more than erased any extra money I “saved” on buying the garbage in the first place.
  6. ALWAYS sleeve your pipes where they pass under roads.
    This keeps them from breaking when heavy trucks (garbage) pass over them repeatedly.
  7. Get a qualified engineer to design your system.
    I would have no hesitation in designing a system for my park near Youngstown, but then I have years of experience doing this type of work.
  8. Be on site the entire time the work is being done.
    People do better work when someone is watching. The garbage that contractors put in below the ground would amaze you. "