Recourse for non-payment


#1

As an owner, what recourse do you have if a home owner does not pay park rent? Is it the same as a rental home? In CA, you can use a 3 Day notice to pay or quit and can give anybody a 30 notice to vacate without cause (this is subject to local areas of jurisdiction and rent control)

My question is trying to look forward to a troubled economy. If people cannot make space rent payments how do you handle it? I assume you can force them to move the MH, but how difficult is this? How do you enforce an order to move the home? It’s not like the sherrif will show up with a tractor trailer rig and “hook em up”.


#2

It’s not fun. From what I understand as I blunder through one now: If there is no lien holder i.e. they own the home and they are evicted. They are required to remove all their property and the home is their property. They can’t afford $1500 to move the home when they can’t afford to pay $200 rent so they leave the home. Then abandoned property rules kick in. You have to legally notify them, give them time to respond and time to get their property. They won’t. If the home is valued at less than a certain amount $750 in my state, one set of rules applies saying essentially you can get rid of it. If it is over $750 then you have to ask the state’s permission to sell it. If sold, you can apply proceeds toward back rent, your costs, the excess going to the state. You can’t just sell it to your neighbor for a dollar. You have to make a “commercial effort to sell” The problem is no one going to pay $2000 to move a home only worth $1000. So you are stuck with the home. You can buy it. If it didn’t sell, then maybe it is worth under $750. The papers have several ads for “free home - you move it”. Disposing of a home isn’t cheap either. Metal, insulation, wood have to be separated - an cost $2000 for a hired company. All of the above is state dependent. In some states, county rules may be a factor. In others, vehicle laws may apply. My advice is to contact your mobile home association. Attorneys often aren’t familiar with mobile homes.