Re: Pet (Dog) Policies


#1

I am a landlord and I’m very familiar with dogs (I used to be a volunteer dog trainer).

I do allow pets (max. of 1 dog and max. of 1 cat).

I require to meet the potential tenant’s pet(s). I look for it’s personality and how well behaved (or not). I do basic tests on the pets such as giving it a treat (to see if it’s food aggressive), gently pull ear, hair, tail while I’m petting, etc.

If I find the dog timid or overly affectionate (i.e. bouncing around, jumping on me repetitively, etc), or growls or excessively barking----I reject the potential tenant.

If I find that the pets have not seen their veterinarian on annual basis and their innoculations are not up to date----I reject the potential tenant.

If I find that the dog is not under verbal restraint (i.e. dog literally does not obey to command such as: Fido, come! Fido, stay!, etc.)----I reject the potential tenant.

If I find that the dog and cat is not neutered/spayed----I reject the potential tenant.

If I find that the dog and cat is among the “bully breeds”----I reject the potential tenant.

Should I find potential tenants who are good dog/cat owners (the way it should be!), I require proof of veterinarian report and proof of renter’s insurance naming me as “co-beneficiary” BEFORE I give them the key to my rental properties.

I do not allow new pets, under any circumstances, without first consulting me. I do not allow dogs under the age of 18 - 24 months (depending on breed). I do not allow kittens under the age of 4 months. I do not allow any bully breeds, including mixed bully breeds.

I charge $25/mo rent, per pet, on top of the basic rent.

Generally, I do not charge pet deposit----too complicated for some states. One example is that it is against the law to charge pet deposit in the state of California. Another example has to do with some states allowing “comfort animals” requiring landlords to accept.

Insurance waiver, in some states, is illegal. Plus, insurance waiver is ineffective. Better to get renter’s insurance naming the landlord as “co-beneficiary”.