Pet Pigs, Roosters, Peacocks....... WTF!

I can’t believe I am about to buy my first trailer park. What am I thinking.???
I walked the park today and introduced myself to most of the residents. I listened patiently to their whining about their neighbor and the lady at the end… When I arrived at one lady’s trailer, I introduced myself and she told me she is off today, but she is a nurse. After speaking for a minute, she said she did have a pet that stays inside. Its a 200 lb pig!!! I am serious! What do I do now MHP experts?
To add to this, trailer 1 has 4 dogs and trailer 36 has roosters, chickens and peacock!
3 of them complained they have no money to paint or buy a lawn mower to mow their lot. One of them has cars that are used for the demolition derby to raise money for cancer (there are 9 demolished cars laying around).
Should I run from this? How am I going to clean this place up? I am a lone ranger, a one man show. My friends think I have gone loopy and my wife isn’t saying much.
HELP!!!

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First order of business is consult an attorney in the Park’s state who can guide you through the process to update the Park Rules that you can enforce to get rid of the animals, dead beat tenants, ratty cars, etc.

An absentee landlord who does not enforce the rules leaves behind a park like this for you to clean up. The first 6 months are the worst. Once the tenants understand how you will run the park they begin to adhere.

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If you are stressing out in the DD phase, then definitely think twice about it. Do get your wife’s input and trust your gut. It may be that for your first park what you need is a nice cash flowing community, not a project park.

If you have it under contract at a good price you may be able to assign to someone with more risk tolerance and experience and still make a profit. You may also be able to partner with a more experienced investor.

My opinion only…

First, you decide if you have what it takes to go through the process to change that park and if it is worth the costs emotionally, financially, etc. . If you don’t… move on NOW. If you think you do… Second, you learn the state laws. Third, you decide what kind of park you want to operate. Fourth , you write your rules and leases accordingly (lawyer advice is priceless here). Once again… you decide if you have what it takes to go through the process to change that park and if it is worth the costs emotionally, financially, etc. .

There IS such a thing as money not worth making.

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Jsmith is on the money. You must decide what kind if community you want and whether this one has the upside potential financially to be worth the work necessary to turn it around. There must be the ability to raise the rents considerably after all the effort of turning it around before you take on the challenge.
Attempting to turn a “trailer park” into a community is not something you do for fun.
How far below marker are the existing lot rents.

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@tonka , as per your post:

  • “I can’t believe I am about to buy my first trailer park. What am I thinking???”
  • “…pet that stays inside. It’s a 200 lb pig!!!”
  • “…trailer 1 has 4 dogs and trailer 36 has roosters, chickens and peacock!”
  • “…there are 9 demolished cars laying around…”
  • “Should I run from this?”

My Husband and I own 2 Mobile Home Parks.

The first MHP was a Stable MHP. After owning the Stable MHP for a year we purchased a Turn-Around MHP.

The Turn-Around MHP had some issues. We have been slowly turning the MHP around for the past 4 1/2 years. Our motto is: “Slow & Steady wins the race”.

When we first purchased our Turn-Around MHP, it had a Lot with a Dog Hoarder (who had been evicted by another MHP) and a couple of Lots with large dogs.

We implemented the following “Dog Policy”:

  • Dog - Weight = Maximum Weight Of 30 Pounds @ Full Maturity
  • Service Dogs/Emotional Support Dogs Are Allowed As Per Law With Proper Documentation
  • Dog - # Limit = Per Lot = Maximum Of 2 Dogs
  • Dog - Vaccination = All Dogs Are Required To Be Up-To-Date On Their Rabies Vaccination

We had 2 Lots with Large Dogs who were not so happy with our “Dog Policy”. One Lot ended up moving out their Mobile Home and the other Lot sold their Mobile Home.

We also had a couple of lots with roosters and chickens. We were surprised to see roosters and chickens because the Mobile Home Park is located in the middle of a residential area in the City Limits.

Code Enforcement for the City came to our MHP and we asked them about the roosters and chickens.

As per the City roosters and chickens are acceptable. Thus, we allow our Tenants to have roosters and chickens in Chicken Coops.

I like to say “We traded Large Dogs for Chickens”.

Now once in a blue moon a Chicken will escape. However, they are quickly caught and placed back in their Chicken Coop.

Here are two photos of escaped chickens/roosters before they were placed back in their Coop.

This photo makes me smile. It is a chicken on top of a Mobile Home Moving Company Truck.

Here is another photo of them in our greenspace.

image

Please note that as per City Laws other farm animals are not allowed.

Thus, I would check with your City or County concerning their Laws and Regulations for pigs.

As for the 9 Demolished Cars laying around; that should not be acceptable (whether it be a City Rule or MHP Rule).

We inherited a “Junk Hoarder” in our Turn-around MHP. The City Code Enforcement would come and write “Tickets” for all the “Junk”. Eventually, this Tenant ended up moving out his Mobile Home.

As previously stated, you need to determine if you have the ability to:

  • Understand & Accept That Some MHPs Might Not Look Like Your Residential Neighborhood
  • Create Rules & Regulations
  • Follow Through On Those Rules & Regulations

Owning a MHP is not for the faint of heart.

My Husband & I run our MHPs. I do the Inside-Office Work and he does the Outside-Field Work.

My Husband loves to say “There is never a dull day in the MHP” :blush:

We wish you the very best!

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Tonka, if you are willing to turn the property around PLAN ON SPENDING lots of time (what is your time worth) and if the sites are presently full and some need to leave perhaps the value could go down when the beauty comes back!!! It will need the owners attention not just a manager!

I really appreciate all of the responses and the pics of chickens or roosters or whatever they were.
I am considering this challenge. It is 17 sites and at one time it was expandable to 35. Once cleaned up, the town may be back on board with expansion (after I told them the address of the property, they have not gotten back to me). Other people in the area rolled their eyes when I told them I was interested in buying this property. I am going to check details with my lawyer and I have a junk removal guy going out there tomorrow. Thanks again for your supportive comments. It really helped me think it through.

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Sounds like the subject for a running thread on what you found and what you do over the next few years.

I’d agree to make sure you and your wife have the emotional bandwidth to handle the project. Also the capitol available because just like in rehabbing a house it always cost more and takes longer than you expect it to.

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If you are stressing out in the DD phase, then definitely think twice about it. Do get your wife’s input and trust your gut. It may be that for your first park what you need is a nice cash flowing community, not a project park.

Just curious if you did purchase the MHP? What you did about the animals?

I got cold feet…I did not proceed with it. Interests rates were 10% and up so I cancelled it. The park was not close to any major city or town. The numbers made sense and if I had bought it, the income would have helped out right now during this Covid crisis.

My park was pretty much exactly like this when I bought it 14 years ago. Turning it around and getting it to its current (very nice) level was the most single most difficult endeavor of my life. It is profitable now and paying my living expenses while my regular business is affected by the Chinese virus. However, had I known then what I know now, I would have run away from it and never looked back. The worst part was that I found very little of what I “learned” at MHU was applicable. I had to learn everything on the fly and that was a really lousy experience.